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The Local Area

Polruan

Within the village you will find two great pubs serving real local ales and home cooked food, (both pubs offering a takeaway service).

Also a grocery store, a gift shop small bakers and a highly recommended café called jam first.

From the quay a passenger ferry takes you across to the well-known adorable harbour town of Fowey (Ferry service until 11pm) with plenty more shops, including bakers, butcher, pharmacist, restaurants, more pubs, and takeaways.

Fishing trips and boat hire are also available, take a trip on the Fowey to Mevagissey ferry you may see the dolphins or basking sharks.
The perfect place for Walkers, Photographers, Artists, Fisherman, and Bird watchers a like or just relax and unwind and enjoy this extremely unique un-spoilt charming Cornish location, and if you should feel the need to venture further we do have a local bus service also available from the park.


All set within an idyllic location for the Eden Project, Polkerris, Looe, polperro, The Lost gardens of Heligan, Lanhydrock, Charlestown and more.

We have some of the most spectacular walks that Cornwall has to offer and many can be accessed just yards from the park, Polruan is an area full of ancient surprises, with it’s unspoiled charm narrow streets and narrower alleyways where flights of slate steps twist between the houses, with churches dedicated to obscure Celtic saints, deeply wooded valleys and surrounding remote villages, it is perhaps no  coincidence that Daphne de Maurier found Polruan an inspiration for many of her novels.

Polruan holidays is situated at the very top of Polruan village yet a mere 200 meters from the south west coast path, which takes you to the Great Lantic beach and Pencarrow head and further on to the picturesque harbour town of Polperro and the very popular fishing port of Looe, if you head west you will soon ascend upon Gribben Head, Polkerris and Par beach, venture further to Charlestown, (filming of Poldark).


From Fowey you can hire a boat and take a trip up this magnificent stretch of the estuary where you may see cormorants, egrets, mallards, swans, herons and kingfishers that make this part of the river their home, stop off at Golant and take a rest at the Fisherman’s Arms and then head-on to the stunning village of Lerryn where the village green lies beside the water’s edge, Kenneth Graham based Wind in the Willows and the tales of Ratty and Mole on the riverbanks here.

Other Local Places to Visit

Fowey

Fowey is a picture-postcard seaside town. It has a proud maritime heritage and is considered by many to be one of Cornwall's most idyllic holiday spots. These include award-winning restaurants, and public houses that have achieved national status and top accolades. Fowey plays host to a number of major events including the Fowey Royal Regatta and the Daphne Du Maurier Literary Festival. Both take place during the summer drawing people from far and wide.

Polperro

Polperro Packed tightly into a steep valley on either side of the River Pol, the quaint colour-washed cottages and twisting streets offer surprises at every turn: the Saxon and Roman bridges, the famous House on Props, the old Watch House, and the fish quay with its protected inner harbour full of colourful boats. Polperro is still a working fishing village, although tourism provides the main source of income. Attractions include a Museum of Smuggling and a Model Village.

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Looe

Looe The Olde Twin Towns of Looe East & West Looe are connected by the Victorian seven arch bridge just seawards from where the east and west Looe Rivers meet, flowing out to sea through the harbour where the fishing boats land their catch, the river then goes out past the banjo pier to the sea leaving the sandy east Looe beach. Looe is full of charming narrow streets and traditional buildings, with penalty shops, pubs, restaurants, takeaways, and a Museum.

Lerryn

Lerryn Well hidden from the tourist trail the stunning village spreads itself around both banks of the Lerryn Creek with a central village green beside the waterside which commands views down river to seemingly endless and uninterrupted forest and creek, inspiration to writers, artists and all who visit.

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Menabilly

Menabilly  has been the seat of the Rashleigh family from the 16th century to the present day. The mansion house, which received a Grade II* listing on 13 March 1951,[3][4] is early Georgian in style, having been re-built on the site of an earlier Elizabethan house, parts of which were possibly incorporated into the present structure.

Bodinnick

Bodinnick lies in the Lanteglos-by-Fowey parish on the banks of the Fowey River. Its importance is due the fact that it was a ferry terminal for people travelling from Fowey. There is an "Old Ferry Inn" close to the bank of the river here.

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Golant

Golant is a small Cornish waterside village. An area of Outstanding Natural Beauty full of scenic views. The rivers east bank is owned by the National Trust. In the summer the river is a hive of boating activity and in the winter left mostly to cormorants, egrets, mallards, swans, herons and kingfishers that make the river their home.

Charlestown

Charlestown is a working harbour and there are a number of skilled shipwrights employed in the shipyard carrying out restoration, repair and general marine maintenance work. It has been the scene of filming of many well-known films and programmes, from Poldark and Doctor Who to Clash of the Titans and Treasure Island.

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Mevagissey

Mevagissey In the narrow streets are many gift shops, craft workshops, galleries, cafés and pubs. There are several hotels and many fish restaurants in Mevagissey, and, of course, plenty of fish and chip shops! Many of the latter were once the haunts of Cornish smugglers.